[PODCAST EPISODE 30] The Mommy Tummy with Dr. Julie Berube

May 06, 2021
 

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About the show:
After childbirth many women deal with "The Mommy Tummy," painful sex, urinary leakage, or a combination of issues. When they gather their courage and ask for help, they're often told to "Just live with it" or "It's just part of being a woman." And this can make them feel defeated, disappointed, or plain old sad - which can lead to emotional eating. Listen to this very special episode with Dr. Julie Berube, Pelvic Floor Physical Therapist, as she shares solutions to all of these issues.

 

Resources from the show:

 


 

Read the full episode transcript below:

Intro:
Welcome to the Weight Loss Before and After Pregnancy Podcast. The place you’ll get simple strategies you can apply to your life today to start losing weight. Strategies that’ll help you reach your goal, move on with your life, and focus on the things that matter most to you. I’m your host, Certified Life and Weight Coach, Andrea Scalici. Let’s get started.

Podcast: 
Hey everybody. Today, I've got a very special episode for you.

In past episodes we've talked about the connection between physical issues you might be having or physical pain that you might be having and emotional eating. We've talked about that before. So we know there is a connection there.

It's like physical issues or physical pain that we might be having could be triggers for us, right? They could trigger thoughts in our brain that lead to some negative feelings that we have in our body, which could lead us into the kitchen, wanting to eat more.

So there is a connection between physical issues, physical pain, and emotional eating, for a lot of people. And what I work on with my clients is more the mental, emotional aspect of things. So we work on our thoughts, we work on our feelings, we work on our actions based on those thoughts and feelings. But we really don't do a whole lot of physical pain or physical issue resolution. So that's why this podcast episode today is going to be really useful for you.

Us women tend to have a lot of very specific physical issues or physical pain after childbirth, after pregnancy. And some of these issues we don't really talk about with other people.

We talk about them maybe with our doctor, with our OB, with our midwife, but we don't really talk about them to a lot of other people. And because of that, if our doctor or our midwife or our OB’s don't have answers that we're looking for, we kind of just think that we have to deal with these things the rest of our lives. And I have recently learned that certain issues that we have that we think we have to deal with the rest of our lives, we actually don't. There are solutions out there. And so that's why I'm very excited about today's guest.

If you plan to have kids in the future, or if you've already had your children, you do not want to miss this episode. We're going to talk about some preventative measures you can take before you go into labor and give birth to your child to reduce any physical issues after pregnancy like tearing.

We're to talk about the mommy tummy. I know that's a big one that a lot of people are excited about. So how to get rid of the mommy tummy. Many of us think that we have to either just live with it or get plastic surgery, but there is another option.

We're going to talk about painful sex after pregnancy and how to get back to enjoyable sex. And we're going to talk about urinary leakage, which I know sounds like something you don't want to talk about. It might sound off putting. But many women have this problem and it's time to look at the solution. So we're going to talk about how to stop this issue and how to get back to regular life.

After childbirth many people deal with this leakage issue. When they cough, when they sneeze, when they laugh, when they pick up their baby, we have this issue when we're working out, like when we're exercising. We make excessive bathroom trips and sometimes we even stop ourselves from doing things that we want to do if we don't know if a bathroom is going to be around or things like that. We purchase many, many, many, probably thousands of dollars worth of pads and tampons to fix the issue, but that is just a temporary fix. So today we're going to talk about all of these issues, get them on the table, talk about them as women and talk about the solutions. 

Now, a little warning here upfront. So as you can tell, some of these things that we're going to talk about are sensitive things. You may not want to listen to this with your kids around or with your spouse around or at work with colleagues listening. You may want to listen to this privately on your own.

There will be some language that we use about female body parts and issues that we have. So listen privately if those things are not things you want to expose other people in your life to.

Our expert today is Dr. Julie Berube. She's a Pelvic Floor Physical Therapist. And I know you're going to love her so much that you're going to want to work with her afterwards, or you're going to want to work with someone in her field.

So we put together a freebie for you, a free PDF download that you can get at www.mcccoaching.com/pt. And PT stands for physical therapy.

So when you go to that website and download the freebie, you'll learn how to find a Pelvic Floor Physical Therapist. You'll learn five questions to ask your Pelvic Floor Physical Therapist. And you'll learn what a Pelvic Floor Physical Therapist can help you with.

Because in today's episode, we're going to present you with three of the main issues that I see my clients facing, but there are way more things that these Physical Therapists can help you with that we're not going to talk about today.

So go to www.mcccoaching.com/pt if you're interested in hiring a Pelvic Floor Physical Therapist after you've heard this episode. I know you're going to be very interested, so go and check it out.

Alright. So let's jump into my interview with Dr. Julie Berube.

 


 

Andrea Scalici:
Alright. We have Dr. Julie Berube here with us. Tell us a little bit about yourself and why you got into this field.

Dr. Julie Berube:
Yeah. Thanks so much for having me, Andrea. I'm really excited to be here today. I'm a practicing Physical Therapist. I've been practicing in the Syracuse area for over seven years now. And in the past two years, I got into the specialty of pelvic floor physical therapy, just through my own personal experience, and then seeing other close women to me go through the health care world and just what a gap there is in the knowledge for women and for who are dealing with pelvic floor conditions like leakage, prolapse and painful sex. And then witnessing how these very common conditions are often just dismissed in our healthcare system. So part of my mission is to really help fill in that gap. And that's why I decided to start my own practice last year. And it's really my mission now to help women learn more about these conditions and really revolutionize the whole standard of healthcare here in New York State.

Andrea Scalici:
That's awesome.

Dr. Julie Berube:
Yeah.

Andrea Scalici:
I was reading a little bit on your website and it was talking about how you were watching TV one day, and it said something like, "Women just have to deal with this."

Dr. Julie Berube:
Yes.

Andrea Scalici:
Like let's just manage it and deal with it. And you're like, "What? No way. There's got to be an answer. There's got to be a better way."

Dr. Julie Berube:
Yes.

Andrea Scalici:
Was that really kind of a thing that lit the fire for you to get into this line of work?

Dr. Julie Berube:
Yeah. So that was the first time that I just couldn't believe it, but the commercial was saying, "Light leaks are just a normal part of being a woman and use pads." And I'm like, “Oh my gosh.” I didn't know much about pelvic floor PT specifically, but I was a physical therapist at that point and knew that there are more options for women and just felt like I really need to get that education and the word out there that women don't have to just live with these very common conditions. But I think the prevalent thought out there is that it's just part of being a woman and it's just something you have to deal with after childbirth or as being a woman.

Andrea Scalici:
So let's just dive right in. Let's start talking about, first of all, preventative measures that women can take. If somebody is pregnant and they're in their pregnancy, are there any preventative measures that they can take to reduce any physical issues that they might have after pregnancy?

Dr. Julie Berube:
Absolutely. There's a lot that we can do working with women during pregnancy to, first of all, just have better awareness around where is the pelvic floor, how to coordinate those muscles, turning them on and off. So the pelvic floor for anyone listening that doesn't know, it's all the muscles right in the base of our pelvis that surround the holes and they help, basically I just call them the muscles of pee, poop and sex. They have a lot of really important functions. And especially when it comes to delivering a baby. So working with women during pregnancy to just to figure out where are those muscles, how do I turn them on and off, what is their strength like? And that kind of comes into play with addressing things like pain and weakness. And then also, how do I relax them in preparation for labor and delivery to hopefully have that go smoothly as well. We work a lot with linking breathing patterns to how you're turning on and off your pelvic floor, which again, comes into play during labor. Breathing becomes super important. And with that coordination piece. Then as pregnancy progresses later on, and around the 36 week mark, we can actually work on something called perineal massage. So working on providing some pressure and a stretching sensation, which is slightly uncomfortable and then learning how to breathe through that again, in preparation for labor and to hopefully prevent things like tearing that sometimes happens during vaginal deliveries. So that's just a piece of it. I mean, there's a lot we can do preventatively too, with staying active and healthy and keeping up your exercise routine and then addressing any aches and pains as they come up as well. I think a lot of women think that they have to, again, deal with pains during pregnancy. It just kind of goes along with it, but that's not true. We can address a lot of that, those things and get you feeling pretty good during pregnancy as well.

Andrea Scalici:
I just want to point out something you just said, because it is really important for people to hear. And I think they're going to be very interested in the idea that you can reduce the tearing that might happen during delivery, by working with someone like you or working with you during pregnancy. So that's huge, right? Because some women tear, some women don't, but there is a way to possibly reduce that tearing. So that's very interesting.

Dr. Julie Berube:
Yes. Yeah. And I was looking up some of the actual research behind that just to share with people. So there was actually a Cochrane Review in 2013, which that's a pretty good, powerful study that goes through and looks at a lot of different studies and kind of comes up with a summary. And they found that doing this perineural massage reduces the likelihood of perineal trauma requiring suturing, and also the report from ongoing perineural pain after delivery. And then there was one other study I found in International Urogynecology Journal, and that was in April, 2019. And that one compared doing perineal massage with pelvic floor muscle training and education, compared to just education alone. And that first group, of course, of the perineal massage and the pelvic floor muscle training, they have significantly less complicated delivery, less perineal tearing, decreased rates of a physiognomy and less post natal pain than in just that education group. So it's really powerful.

Andrea Scalici:
Interesting. Yeah. And I know we're going to talk about this a little bit later on in this interview, but is that tearing also linked to painful sex after giving birth?

Dr. Julie Berube:
Yeah.

Andrea Scalici:
Interesting.

Dr. Julie Berube:
And I know we'll get more into that, but that can be one of the, there's four different things that I've found that can kind of contribute to postpartum pain with sex. And one of them is scar tissue from perineal tears.

Andrea Scalici:
Ok. And we will definitely talk about that shortly.

Dr. Julie Berube:
Yeah.

Andrea Scalici:
So if anyone's very interested in that, that's coming. Ok. So in order to prevent any possible physical issues after pregnancy, this is very important to be able to reduce the tearing, working with you or someone like you in your field to do that. Now, is this natural delivery only that women tear or is anything related to C-section as well?

Dr. Julie Berube:
With C-section, you won't have the perineal tearing occurring just because they're going in abdominally. But you will still have some scar tissue just in a different area. So we still work with your C-section scar as well, just like how you would work with your perineal scar. Both of those things we would be working with in pelvic floor PT, postpartum.

Andrea Scalici:
Ok. I want to move on now and talk about the big topic that I think most of the women listening to this are really going to want to know. Let's talk about the mommy tummy.

Dr. Julie Berube:
Yes, let's talk about it.

Andrea Scalici:
Ok. Tell me what happens during pregnancy and during labor and all of that, just in the most basic simple terms with the tummy. Because so many women have trouble losing the weight in the tummy area after the baby is born. And most of us think we either have to just deal with it, we're going to have this excess skin forever. Or we can get plastic surgery. It's like on the two furthest ends of the spectrum, deal with it or plastic surgery. And I really want to talk to you about alternatives here. And I know you work with a lot of people with this. What happens that makes it harder to tone up that core after pregnancy?

Dr. Julie Berube:
Yeah. What we call this is diastasis recti or DR. People might've heard that term before. But it's basically just a fancy term for abdominal separation. Which we have four different abdominal layers. One of them on the front is like our six pack abs, which we all have them in there. A lot of women are like, "No, I don't have those." We all have them. They're in there. So everyone in pregnancy, because to make room for the baby as your abdomen area grows, that six pack abdominal muscles on the front, they do have to separate just to create space. That's completely normal. So everyone by the end of pregnancy will have abdominal separation or a diastasis, as I mentioned. So as those abdominal muscles separate, there's a connective tissue in between called your Linea Alba. And sometimes what we see postpartum is we still are getting this mommy tummy appearance or a feeling of really significant weakness or like your organs just kind of want to fall out the front of you when you're trying to exercise, such as like doing planks, for example. So women will notice either the appearance looking different, a kind of pointy, coning, doming look to their stomach when they're trying to exercise, or just that feeling of just feeling really weak with the activities they're trying to do around the house and with the baby. So I know you mentioned there's a spectrum of either surgery or do nothing. But kind of in the middle is the option of working with a pelvic floor physical therapist to learn how to reactivate your abdominal muscles. And through specific exercises, just bringing them back together so you don't have that separation in the front and you feel stronger and sometimes appearance also changes. And really just building that strength underneath, so you feel good and confident.

Andrea Scalici:
Ok. What are reasonable expectations of working on the core in this way, in terms of getting your flat abs back?

Dr. Julie Berube:
There can be actual extra skin and elasticity, so things have been overstretched sometimes. So that may not return completely to normal. And there's even with lots of exercise and weight management and all of that, there may still be that extra skin or elasticity there. But what we can expect through working on these muscles is in everyone, we can create strength, even if it's been many years, since you delivered children and have had this underlying abdominal separation that's been persisting. We can still create strength there even years down the road. And I have seen women go from, we measure the separation just with width of how many fingers can fit in the middle and kind of sink in. And I've seen women go from having a four finger width separation back to less than a one finger width. So you can expect some really good improvement in how those muscles come together, how they work to support your core, feeling strong with activity. But sometimes just due to the skin and the extra tissue that's there, appearance may not be the same as it was pre-baby.

Andrea Scalici:
Now, you mentioned you can work on this many, many years after childbirth. So, I mean, are we talking like five years, ten years, like forty years?

Dr. Julie Berube:
Yeah. It's never too late to build strength, honestly. I worked with women who are now in menopause and working on like all of these issues that we're going to talk about. But it's never too late. We can always make positive changes, especially around strength with targeted exercise and guidance for sure at any age.

Andrea Scalici:
Now, to my listeners, everyone hearing this, this is amazing. I don't know if you've ever even realized this is an option. I just recently learned about the option of working with a Pelvic Floor Physical Therapist on the mommy tummy. But the options do not have to be, deal with your body or get plastic surgery. There is another option with working with Dr. Berube or someone in her field to be able to get your tummy back. And at the same time we always talk about working on your emotions. So if your tummy doesn't go back to the way it used to be, or if there's a little excess skin, that's when working on your emotions and working on your thoughts and feelings about your tummy come into play. Because we are human beings. We are not meant to be perfect. There is no perfect. Life is exactly what we make of it. And we can do physical things to make things like our tummy better after pregnancy. But working on our thoughts and feelings about these things will also help us keep everything aligned with the person that we want to be and aligned with keeping our emotional eating in check. So I just wanted to kind of throw that in there. Ok.

Dr. Julie Berube:
I love that. I think that's huge. Working on the emotional, mental aspect, as well as the physical, it all compliments each other, for sure.

Andrea Scalici:
Alright. So, that's awesome. I love that there is another option for the mommy tummy. The next thing we're going to talk about is when women experience painful sex after childbirth. What causes painful sex and how can you help women with this issue?

Dr. Julie Berube:
Yeah. Before I dive into what causes it, I just want to point out a really shocking statistic, which is that one in four women are still having pain with sex a year and a half postpartum. So to me, that number that's unacceptable. We need to get that down.

Andrea Scalici:
Yes.

Dr. Julie Berube:
There's, in my opinion, kind of four different areas or issues that could be contributing to why sex may be painful postpartum, where it wasn't beforehand. The first one is due to hormone changes. So postpartum, especially if you're also lactating or breastfeeding, you're going to have lower estrogen levels. And this actually affects the tissues in our pelvic floor area or our perineum, we could say. It makes them thinner and drier than they normally would be. So I usually use the example of healthy vaginal tissue. It's like the little pad at the base of your thumb. It should feel nice and plump and squishy like that. De-estrogenized tissue feels more like the web space in between your thumb and your forefinger, kind of rough and a little thinner. So just due to these hormone changes, sometimes just knowing that information is helpful so that you can talk to your partner about using a quality water-based lubricant and just not feeling bad about the emotions behind all of that and having to use the lubricant, but just it's due to a hormone change. The one that I recommend frequently is called Slippery Stuff, and you can get it on Amazon. It's the one I use for my exams as well. And that's just a really quality non-irritating lubricant that can be really great. And then also there's options out there like topical estrogen creams, which you would talk to your OB-GYN about potentially, just to use short term until hormones kind of normalize out again. So that's one reason.

Andrea Scalici:
I was just going to ask you that, so the hormones will normalize out. This is kind of just a temporary thing.

Dr. Julie Berube:
Exactly.

Andrea Scalici:
Part of the problem. Ok.

Dr. Julie Berube:
Yeah. It just takes time. But then again, like as we get into perimenopause and menopause, women can end up dealing with this issue just again, due to the hormone changes. But yes, postpartum, they will eventually equalize out again. It just takes some time. And then our second reason why sex may be painful postpartum is due to what we were talking about before. If there was any perineal tearing or that tearing in the vaginal area, it creates scar tissue. And sometimes that heals completely fine and women don't have any issues with it. Sometimes that scar is a little bit sticky or not moving as well as it could be and that's creating some pain or friction, extra friction during intercourse. So working with a pelvic floor physical therapist, we can actually do some hands-on techniques and teach you as well how to mobilize that scar and getting the tissues moving better so that they're not painful.

Andrea Scalici:
Is that something that would eventually heal on its own or is it something that if you're having this issue, it could be long-term?

Dr. Julie Berube:
Right. Sometimes I see, as women get back into intercourse, that in itself is almost like a scar mobilization. So as they have intercourse more times, then it starts to get less sensitive on its own. But other times, because it's painful, then their body starts to, and their brain starts to recognize and anticipate pain. And then the muscles are guarding and creating more pain. So sometimes it goes into kind of a vicious cycle and we just need some extra help to break that pain cycle and de-sensitize that scar.

Andrea Scalici:
Ok. What's number three?

Dr. Julie Berube:
Yeah.

Andrea Scalici:
This is so interesting.

Dr. Julie Berube:
Yeah. Number three is related to those pelvic floor muscles. So all the ones that surround those openings. These muscles during pregnancy for everyone can become shortened and tightened just because they're working on over time. Because the ab muscles that we talked about earlier are getting overstretched and expanding to accommodate the baby. So sometimes our pelvic floor on the bottom is overworking and getting shortened and tight. After delivery, a lot of times, again like these muscles can go back to normal. You may not have any issues with them, but if they stay overly shortened and tight, it can create what's called like a knot or a trigger point. So just like how you might sometimes have a knot in your shoulders or your neck muscles, the same thing can actually happen in our pelvic floor muscles. So if they have these areas of tension, then again, during intercourse that tense or tightened muscle can be creating a source of pain as well. So what we do in pelvic floor PT is work on lengthening these muscles, getting them back to their normal resting state. Again, hands-on techniques, breathing and exercise just to kind of restore the muscles to a better place where they're not creating pain anymore. And then our last issue could just be do, this one's a tough one. It's sexual desire and arousals can just definitely be a lower postpartum because of all the big life changes going on, lack of sleep, decreased time with your partner. So that one is kind of the fourth and final reason of why intercourse may be more painful.

Andrea Scalici:
Yeah. That's a big one that I see and that I talk to my clients about. Like all of the mom's stress and overwhelm after the baby is born. And also it's a major life transition. There's so many new things happening. Your life is never going to be the same as it was before.

Dr. Julie Berube:
Absolutely.

Andrea Scalici:
You have a lot less free time. It is very different. And that makes sense. So this is so fascinating because when I hear a lot of people talk about issues like this it's, there's something wrong with me, this is my fault, I'm never going to be the same. And they blame themselves for not being able to connect with their partners the way they used to or have sex as much as they used to and all of that stuff. And they blame themselves and emotions stir up about that when we tend to put things on our own shoulders and blame ourselves for that. And that's where more emotional eating comes into play. And so I think it's really interesting to hear that there's other things happening here. There's physical things happening here that you can get solved. You can work on a pelvic floor physical therapist with. And you don't have to live with this the rest of your life. Also, just like we talked about before, working on your thoughts and feelings about these issues as you're going through them. You don't want to blame yourself or hate on yourself or things like this. And it's very easy to fall into that, but to love yourself through it will really help you get the results you want a lot faster and make you make you feel a lot better as you do it. So I just wanted to throw that in there.

Dr. Julie Berube:
Absolutely. I love that. Yeah, absolutely.

Andrea Scalici:
Ok. So the mommy tummy, we talked about, can be fixed. Painful sex, can be fixed. Let's talk about leakage, because this is a big one. I know not every woman deals with this after pregnancy, after childbirth, but a lot of women do. And a lot of people don't talk about it. It's kind of like this hidden little secret. Let's just buy boxes and boxes of pads and tampons the rest of our life to deal with this and never get any resolve from it. So what causes it? Why does this happen?

Dr. Julie Berube:
Ok. So there could be two different reasons why you're having leakage issues postpartum. One of them could be if the pelvic floor muscles are weak, or not turning on at the right time, or even just quick enough, you can have leaks occur with pressure changes in your body. So like during a cough or sneeze, or when you're trying to run or jump or squat down with your kids. So it could be due to during times like that you may be noticing the leaks. Or sometimes I actually see if the muscles are overly tight, we can be experiencing leaks as well, just because they're working over time all the time. They're already tight, they're already on a lot. And so when it comes time to actually turn on when you need them to stop a leak, they've already been just so overworked and shortened and tight that they can't, they really have nowhere else to go to give you any extra support. And then sometimes we also have developed some poor bladder habits throughout pregnancy that just kind of feed into these leakage issues where you're running to the bathroom all the time or emptying your bladder preventatively a lot when you don't really need to. So that can just kind of feed into these leakage issues as well. And actually a third of women will have urinary leakage at some point during these first three months postpartum. And then really surprisingly, if they're still having leakage issues at the first 12 weeks or three months, 92% of them are still going to be having leakage issues one year out if they don't do something specific to address this. So it's not necessarily just going to get better on its own if it's still persisting at that three month mark. Yeah.

Andrea Scalici:
Those are huge statistics.

Dr. Julie Berube:
Yeah.

Andrea Scalici:
And it's so funny, I mean, everyone has a different range of how much leakage they're having and how big of a problem it is for them. But it can happen when you cough, when you laugh, when you sneeze, when you're picking up your baby, it can happen when you're working out. It happens in so many different day-to-day situations. And it can be really annoying, right? For a lot of people.

Dr. Julie Berube:
Absolutely. Or having to plan all your outings around where the bathroom is going to be, because you're not sure you'll make it there in time. Because that's happening on the way to the bathroom or when you're trying to unbutton your pants or when you hear running water. So those are some other triggers I'll hear too. The urinary leakage issues, come to pelvic floor PT. We have great success with this. Coming for about six to eight weeks, you can fully resolve the leakage issues, regardless of which type of triggers you're having and things. But I've seen such great success with women just learning the exercises specific to their issue. Whether the muscles are overly tight or overly weak, we figure that out and then come up with a plan to get you leak-free, pad-free. One of my favorite things was a client tagged me on Instagram in a video of her jumping on her trampoline. I was like, that's the best. That's when you know you're leak free when you can do that.

Andrea Scalici:
That's awesome.

Dr. Julie Berube:
Yeah.

Andrea Scalici:
Well, I feel like your line of work is this hidden secret that nobody knows about. Why don't more of us know about what you can do for us women after childbirth? You're a hidden secret.

Dr. Julie Berube:
I know. So that's my mission is to get the word out there, get women talking about it, because unfortunately, sometimes our medical providers just aren't either aware or informing women that this is an option and they're just getting kind of the surgical options, or the just live with it, or the have a glass of wine to relax kind of advice. We've just got to get the word out, get women talking about it. Even if you haven't dealt with these issues, just sharing it with close women in your life and telling them that there's options out there.

Andrea Scalici:
Man, I am so glad that we are offering them this interview so they can learn about this, because it's just, there's so many people struggling and suffering with these things and really not talking to anybody about it. So just to know that there are options out there and that we don't have to live with it is really key. If you work with somebody on any of these issues, are we talking like, is it a long time that it takes for them to work with you to resolve some of these issues? Or is it a short amount of time? How much time does it typically take? I know it's probably case by case for a lot of people, but do you have any estimates you can give us?

Dr. Julie Berube:
Yeah, definitely. Somewhere in like a two to three month range. So within the first even just couple first visits, sometimes we're already seeing some improvements, some great improvements. And that's a great sign. And then within the first like two to three months, that's usually about how long I work with women for. And we're getting these issues well under control within that eight, 12 week mark, somewhere in there.

Andrea Scalici:
Wow. That is not a lot of time. That's insane that you can really resolve some of these issues in just a few weeks, a few months, when most people are dealing with them their entire lives.

Dr. Julie Berube:
A comment I hear a lot is, "I wish I had known about this sooner."

Andrea Scalici:
Yeah. I can see why.

Dr. Julie Berube:
Yup.

Andrea Scalici:
Alright. So ladies, if you're listening, you need to work with Dr. Berube. Can you tell us how people can get a hold of you and work with you and ask you questions and just connect with you?

Dr. Julie Berube:
Yeah. So I'd love to connect with everyone. Probably the best way is to, I'm on Instagram. My handle there is @LiveWellCNYPT. And same for Facebook. Either one is fine. My website is www.livewellcnypt.com. And if anyone would like to actually work with me, I am a licensed Physical Therapist for New York State. So I can work with women, unfortunately just in New York State, but I'd still love to connect with you regardless of where you live. So women in New York State, I offer virtual appointments. And then if you're in the Syracuse area or surrounding areas drivable, my office or my clinic is in Manlius, New York, which is just east of the Syracuse area. So I offer the in-clinic appointments if you're close, or virtual if you're in New York State.

Andrea Scalici:
And we will connect to all of that in the show notes as well. So just wrapping up here, is there anything else that you want to share with people?

Dr. Julie Berube:
I think just going back to that point that we were talking about earlier, it's never too late to reach out. Don't count yourself out. We can always make positive changes, no matter, regardless of how many years it's been since you had kids or how old you are. We can always make good improvements in all of these things that we've discussed today. So don't count yourself out.

Andrea Scalici:
So good. Thank you so much for coming on today. This was awesome.

 


 

Alright. Wow. That was valuable information. And I know you love Dr. Berube as much as I did. So if you are in New York State, or if you're in the Syracuse area, hire her immediately. You can find all of her information in the show notes.

If you're not in the New York State area, then you can still connect with her and find that information in the show notes. Or you can find a pelvic floor physical therapist in your area.

So make sure to go to mcccoaching.com/pt. That's PT like physical therapy. Download the freebie we have for you there. You'll learn how to find a Pelvic Floor Physical Therapist. You'll learn five questions to ask your Pelvic Floor Physical Therapist. And you'll learn what a Pelvic Floor Physical Therapists can help you with.

Because like I said before, we talked about three of the main issues that I see my clients facing, but there's way more things that these physical therapists can help you with. So make sure to go there, download the freebie, learn this information and hire one immediately.

Thanks for listening, everybody. I'll talk to you next week.

Outro:
If you loved this podcast, I want to invite you to check out The 6 Stages Weight Loss Program. It’s my signature program that’ll teach you everything you need to know from start to finish to lose weight, reach your goal, and maintain it once you’re there. You’ll also learn how to have your own back through the process. Join me over at mcccoaching.com/join. I’ll see you there.

 

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